Patria Musumeci

Bottom Of Foot Pain In Morning

Treating Mortons Neuroma

Overview

intermetatarsal neuromaA Morton's neuroma usually develops between the third and fourth toes. Less commonly, it develops between the second and third toes. Other locations are rare. It also is rare for a Morton's neuroma to develop in both feet at the same time. The condition is much more common in women than men, probably as a result of wearing high-heeled, narrow-toed shoes. This style of shoe tends to shift the bones of the feet into an abnormal position, which increases the risk that a neuroma will form. Being overweight also increases the risk of a Morton's neuroma.

Causes

Anything that causes compression or irritation of the nerve can lead to the development of a neuroma. One of the most common causes comes from wearing shoes that have a tapered toe box, or high-heeled shoes that cause the toes to be forced into the toe box and overload pressure onto the forefoot. An injury or trauma to the forefoot may also lead to a neuroma. People at a higher risk of developing a Neuroma include people with certain foot deformities, such as bunions or hammertoes. Certain foot types, such as flat feet (Pronation) More flexible feet, and woman after pregnancy.

Symptoms

Normally, there are no outward signs, such as a lump, because this is not really a tumor. Burning pain in the ball of the foot that may radiate into the toes. The pain generally intensifies with activity or wearing shoes. Night pain is rare. There may also be numbness in the toes, or an unpleasant feeling in the toes. Runners may feel pain as they push off from the starting block. High-heeled shoes, which put the foot in a similar position to the push-off, can also aggravate the condition. Tight, narrow shoes also aggravate this condition by compressing the toe bones and pinching the nerve.

Diagnosis

Patients with classic Morton?s neuroma symptoms will have pain with pressure at the base of the involved toes (either between the 2nd and 3rd toes, or between the 3rd and 4th toes). In addition, squeezing the front of the foot together can exacerbate symptoms. As well, they may have numbness on the sides of one toe and the adjacent toe, as this corresponds with the distribution of the involved nerve.

Non Surgical Treatment

Common treatments involve wearing different shoes or using arch supports. Resting the foot, massaging the toes and using an ice pack may work for some people. A GP or a podiatrist (foot specialist) may also recommend anti-inflammatory painkillers or a course of steroid injections. Numbing injections, in which alcohol and a local anaesthetic are injected into the affected area of the foot, may also be effective. In extreme cases, when the condition does not respond to treatment, day case surgery may be needed.intermetatarsal neuroma

Surgical Treatment

Majority of publications including peer review journal articles, surgical technique description and textbooks promote surgical excision as a gold standard treatment. Surgical excision is described as the most definitive mode of treatment for symptomatic Morton?s neuroma with reported success rates varying between 79% and 93%. Various surgical techniques are described, essentially categorised as dorsal versus plantar incision approaches. Beyond this the commonest technical variation described as influencing the outcome of surgery involves burying and anchoring transacted nerve into soft tissue such as muscle.

Prevention

Wearing shoes that fit properly and that have plenty of room in the toe area may help prevent Morton's neuroma.
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